Rising food prices in Sub-Saharan Africa
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Rising food prices in Sub-Saharan Africa poverty impact and policy responses by Quentin Wodon

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Published by World Bank in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Food prices -- Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Poverty -- Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Economic conditions

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementQuentin Wodon, Hassan Zaman.
SeriesPolicy research working paper -- 4738, Policy research working papers (Online) -- 4738.
ContributionsZaman, Hassan., World Bank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23238052M
LC Control Number2009655672

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Downloadable! The increase in food prices represents a major crisis for the world's poor. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential impact of higher food prices on poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, and examines the extent to which policy responses will benefit the poor. The paper shows that rising food prices are likely to lead to higher poverty in sub-Saharan Africa as the negative. Get this from a library! Rising food prices in Sub-Saharan Africa: poverty impact and policy responses. [Quentin Wodon; Hassan Zaman;] -- "The increase in food prices represents a major crisis for the world's poor. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential impact of higher food prices on poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, and. The increase in food prices represents a major crisis for the world's poor. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential impact of higher food prices on poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. They show that rising food prices are likely to lead to higher poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa as the negative impact on net consumers outweighs the benefits to producers. A recent survey shows that the most common policy response in Sub-Saharan African countries in was reducing taxes on food, while outside the region subsidies were the most.

With the population of sub-Saharan Africa expected to increase at an average annual rate of percent from million in to reach billion by , food production systems will be placed under growing pressure in an already difficult setting of rising urbanization and environmental.   As these households depend on markets for two-thirds of their food supplies, prices have become a key determinant of access to food. However, food prices are % higher in sub-Saharan Africa than in the rest of the world at comparable levels of per capita income. These price levels have a negative impact on the purchasing power of households.   Using data f rural households across 93 locations in 17 countries of sub-Saharan Africa we found that a staggering 37% of the households were food insecure – unable to achieve household food security even if all forms of income were converted into calories (Frelat et al., ). Food insecurity is an important dimension of poverty. Today on Business Edge, Joe Hanson and Abdulateef Ahmed talk about the rising Food Insecurity in Africa.

In East Africa, violent protests have erupted in Uganda and Djibouti. In Uganda, protests were organised against rising food and fuel prices as well as rising public transport costs. (22) Urban middle class citizens also showed their frustration towards corruption and poor delivery of . Rising Food Prices in Sub-Saharan Africa: Poverty Impact and Policy Responses Quentin Wodon and Hassan Zaman. World Bank. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential impact of higher food prices on poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, and examines the extent to which policy responses will benefit the poor.   Rising Food Prices Threaten World's Poor People Date: January 2, with Sub-Saharan Africa suffering the most. As biofuels become increasingly profitable, more land, water, and . Between and , the per capita GDP in the region of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) doubled from $1, to $3, However, a dip in oil prices has sent the continent into an economic slowdown in recent years, exposing Africa’s dependence on certain commodities and distinct lack of infrastructure in other areas, particularly as to its power.